Local Foods

How Sustainable is Your Community?

By Christi Southerland, Prosperity Ag Managing Partner

The term “sustainable city” has been thrown around quite a bit in recent years. Though each region likely has their own definition of a sustainable community, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), uses the term “sustainable communities” to describe places “where use of resources and emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants are going down, not up; where the air and waterways are accessible and clean; where land is used efficiently and shared parks and public spaces are plentiful and easily visited; where people of different ages, income levels and cultural backgrounds share equally in environmental, social and cultural benefits; where many needs of daily life can be met within a 20-minute walk and all may be met within a 20-minute transit ride; where industry and economic opportunity emphasize healthy, environmentally sound practices.

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Sustainable Communities 

"Where industry and economic opportunity emphasize healthy, environmentally sound practices." -NRDC

The community described above seems idyllic, however, it is also very hard to achieve. Communities might have a goal of becoming completely sustainable, but funding is a large barrier preventing implementation. Taking small steps each year towards sustainability can be an easier approach while keeping costs reasonable. Further, communities that meet challenges through integrated solutions rather than fragmented approaches while looking at the long term will be more successful. This means it is essential for communities to have an end-goal and a plan in place prior to taking any steps towards sustainability. Having citizen involvement in early-stage planning will also be important for success.

Communities aiming for sustainability can utilize grant and loan programs to achieve their goals. Opportunities abound for projects such as community gardens, integration of renewable energy, wastewater efficiency improvements, building new community facilities, and many more. Further, programs exist to help communities achieve their sustainability goals. Audubon International has a Sustainable Communities Program, which is a science-based, third-party certification program to guide communities through the journey to become healthy and vibrant places to love work and play.

Sustainability is a process that is continuously evolving to meet goals. Communities that embrace this process as part of their overall goal and begin to implement sustainability, they will see a power and positive effect on the quality of life and the future of the community.

Prosperity Ag works with rural communities to become more sustainable. Learn more by downloading our overview of popular funding programs for rural communities.

We'd love to hear about your ideas! Contact us now.

Kids and Veggies: A Love Story

By Karen DuVall

Ask almost any parent and they’ll tell you that it’s a struggle to get their kids to eat vegetables, or even TRY them.

Seriously, just try it… Just a bite. Please… One piece…

It seems like this war has been raging since the dawn of time. Parents and teachers have tried virtually everything to reason, negotiate, and trick their kids into eating something healthy.

Government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and universities have attempted multiple strategies to increase healthy food consumption among children with uneven success. They’ve mounted educational campaigns to share information with parents and children about the nutritional value of fruits and vegetables. They’ve also taken the marketing approach by re-writing popular children’s songs with verses about veggies, and you might remember the controversy around Cookie Monster expanding his culinary palate to include fruit.

But a more down-home solution may exist: getting kids involved in gardening and farming. I was clued into this idea last year while I was catching up with one of my friends over the phone. She mentioned how weird it was that her five-year-old would only eat strawberries from the vines she helped plant. I laughed and thought it was cute, but it turns out that my friend’s daughter isn’t the only one. The research bears this out.

 Kids who garden are more likely to eat their veggies.

Kids who garden are more likely to eat their veggies.

Researchers looked at several studies of garden-based nutrition education programs, and they found that, across the board, gardening increased children’s vegetable consumption

Our results suggest that gardening should be an integral component of wellness programs and policies.
— HortTechnology

Kids’ connection to local farms and farmers also shows promise. The USDA Farm-to-School program links local agricultural producers to K-12 schools to supply fresh local produce. The program also encourages school-based gardening in creative ways. Just for example, a school district in Michigan built two mobile greenhouse buses in its community garden.

The Farm-to-School program has shown signs of success. The Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior did a study on plate waste at six elementary schools to track how much food students were throwing out after their lunches. They found that the kids at schools ate more fruits and vegetables with Farm-to-School procurement from local agriculture, compared to similar schools that did not.

We are grateful for this newfound hope for parents and teachers. All is not lost is the Kids vs. Veggies debate, and Prosperity is here to help. If you are an ag producer, educator, or nonprofit leader who would like more information on funding opportunities for gardening and local foods nutrition programs, we’d love to talk with you! Contact us now and let us know your ideas.