Going Blue in Rural Communities

Karen DuVall, Prosperity Ag Director of Grant Operations

You know what they say about the weather here in Indiana? If you don’t like it, just wait five minutes and it’ll change.

Indiana and much of the Midwest has suffered severe flooding recently. My hometown of Buffalo in northwest Indiana has a population of about 700. When the Tippecanoe River flooded and residents needed to evacuate, neighbors banded together and helped each other out. People volunteered their trucks, tractors, and boats to assist first responders with evacuation efforts. They offer their time, money, and talents to donate meals and supplies. Fortunately, my hometown isn’t unique. Across the country, people in rural areas, small towns, and cities rally together during emergencies to help their communities.

After the initial disaster subsides, residents return to their homes to begin rebuilding. Communities have also suffered major flood damage to their roads and infrastructure.  On top of that, many rural communities are already struggling to improve aging and limited water and waste treatment infrastructure.

At times, opportunities may arise out of crises. According to the Smithsonian, cities around the world are experimenting with going Blue. Most people are familiar with the idea of Going Green, which is focused on reducing the environmental impact created by cities and investing in renewable energy. Smart Cities (making cities more responsive and connected) is another widely accepted concept. “Blue Cities” is the idea that communities should be designed to work with existing water-flow patterns instead of trying to alter them. Cutting edge concepts include a buoyant parking garage in Denmark and floating solar panels in Bahrain. After Hurricane Katrina, Old River Landing in Louisiana used traditional building techniques from the Bayou to develop floating amphibious housing.

Most of these examples are large-scale projects in cities, but this led me to wonder how this technology could be used in rural areas. How can we take some of these futuristic concepts and scale them down to work for small towns and farms? How are we better positioned to use less-populated watersheds and rivers? It’s predicted that the Midwest will see more extreme weather, including record-breaking heat, cold, flooding, droughts, and storms. Now is the time to prepare by investing in Blue technologies on our own terms.

Whether you represent rural government, manage a construction company with an outside-of-the-box idea, or want to improve your energy efficiency, Prosperity Ag is here to help you. We take the mystery out of grants so you find funding. Click here to find out more.